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6/7/2014 2:30:44 PM
The Power of a Service Year
5/30/2014 12:41:11 PM
The Quiet Work of Ethel Kennedy
3/3/2014 10:39:42 AM
On Being Our Brother's Keeper
2/14/2014 10:02:40 AM
Out of the Shadows
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News & Events

August 5, 2014 -  John Bridgeland, CEO of Civic Enterprises, and Melody Barnes write an op-ed, titled "Raising the Bar for Student Success," which emphasizes the importance of curriculum standards in preparing graduates for college and career readiness.  Read here.
July 11, 2014 -  Kathleen McMahon, Chief of Staff at Civic Enterprises, spoke about The Mentoring Effect report at the Children in Need Symposium, hosted by the Lions Clubs International, in Toronto, Canada.  Read the full report here.
July 9, 2014 -  John Bridgeland, CEO of Civic Enterprises and Co-Chair of The Franklin Project, speaks about national service as a lever of opportunity at the NYC Service Summit: For New York City’s Top Nonprofit, Higher Education, Foundation and Corporate Leaders hosted by Hunter College in New York City.
July 1, 2014 -  Jennifer DePaoli, Education Advisor at Civic Enterprises, joined Hofstra University's Morning Wake Up Call on 88.7 FM radio to discuss the nation's high school graduation rate in the 2014 annual update of Building a Grad Nation.  Listen here.
June 24, 2014 -  Franklin Project Co-Chair and BPC Commissioner John Bridgeland joined Senators Trent Lott, Tom Daschle, Olympia Snowe, Dirk Kempthorne and Secretary Dan Glickman in releasing the recommendations of the Commission on Political Reform, including for a Call to Service.  Read the full report here.
June 18, 2014 -  John Bridgeland spoke in the Closing Plenary Session of the Points of Light Conference in Atlanta on the Franklin Project and the Service Year Platform.  Read more about the closing session here.

View Past Events

Graduation Success

Early Intervention Drives Graduation Success

The path to dropout starts early. So the earlier a struggling student is identified, ideally before they enter high school, the better the chances in shifting the odds for success in school, work and life. But that identification must be based on the right data. One effective starting point is identifying the middle and elementary schools that “feed” into the lowest-performing high schools.

United Way Worldwide, Civic Enterprises, and Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University have developed a guide to help you and your community partners identify school feeder patterns – and help your community begin the critical discussion on using that data to boost graduation rates.

This Guide can help you and your community partners:

  • Understand the graduation crisis and effectively convey the rationale for identifying and using school feeder pattern data
  • Understand your community’s education landscape
  • Find out where to access key education national, state, and local information and data
  • Know how graduation rates are calculated and determine your community’s graduation rates
  • Identify feeder school patterns in your community
  • Use school feeder pattern data for greater impact in your community

Download the guide here, and use these tips and this flyer with your board, key volunteers who care about education, partners, funded agencies, and other community stakeholders. If you missed the April 24th webinar focused on school feeder patterns and featuring Bob Balfanz, the nation’s premier researcher on high school dropout on this topic, click here to view the archived Webinar.


Grad Nation Guidebook

Updated Grad Nation Community Guidebook Released

Provides Roadmap For Community Efforts To Increase High School Graduation Rates

May 16, 2013 – Civic Enterprises in partnership with America’s Promise Alliance and The Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University School of Education, released the newest version of the Community Guidebook, a research-based toolkit for communities working to raise graduation rates and better support children and youth from birth through college. The guidebook offers approaches and tools that all communities—regardless of their size, location and challenges—can incorporate at any stage in their work.

The guidebook compiles current research and outlines proven solutions and best practices including school and community interventions, for raising graduation rates. It provides a comprehensive framework to help communities design local dropout prevention efforts as well as 16 downloadable tools that communities can use immediately including tools to determine the actual graduation rate and dropout profile of the community, establish an early warning system and attendance tracker, analyze student and school performance and conduct an assessment of individual and organizational assets and the current policy landscape. The guidebook also includes links to other important and impactful resources that communities can use in their work.

The Community Guidebook is a free, entirely electronic resource available at guidebook.americaspromise.org. 
Check out Education Week's piece on the Community Guidebook here.


Teachers Endorse Social And Emotional Learning As “The Missing Piece” Of Educational Puzzle In Civic Enterprises’ Newly Released Report

May 15, 2013 – Civic Enterprises releases the most comprehensive social and emotional (SEL) research report of late, The Missing Piece: A National Teacher Survey on How Social and Emotional Learning Can Empower Children and Transform Schools. The report, commissioned by CASEL, the Collaborative for Academic Social and Emotional Learning, is the centerpiece of an annual gathering of national education leaders, who convene today in Chicago to discuss the report’s implications and how to move forward based on its findings.

The Missing Piece shares the findings from a nationally representative sample of 605 educators from preschool through 12th grade. The survey reveals that teachers across America believe social and emotional learning is critical to student success in school, work, and life and that teachers think SEL can and should be taught to all students regardless of background and personal circumstances. To support the findings, the report also incorporates case studies of schools successfully implementing SEL, conversations with leading educational thinkers, and a review of SEL literature.

With the knowledge that teachers want and need social and emotional learning and strong examples of implementation in action, we must act to ensure that teachers are supported in this important work, and students are equipped with the knowledge and skills they need to be successful in school, work and life.

The full report can be found here and the official press release here
Check out "The Missing Piece" in EdWeek and the Huffington Post!


Civic Enterprises' CEO Gets Published

John Bridgeland, Civic Enterprises' CEO, recently published his first book, Heart of the Nation: Volunteering and America's Civic Spirit. The book traces America's volunteer tradition- the golden thread of American democracy- and how Presidents from Washington to Obama have called on citizens to serve neighbor and nation. From the bunker below the White House on 9/11 to villages in Africa, John Bridgeland shares his own experiences inside and outside of government to spark more Americans to participate in service. He compellingly argues that such service is fundamental to our own happiness and to what the Founding Fathers envisioned when they talked about the "pursuit of Happiness" in the Declaration of Independence. Bridgeland helps the reader discover their own service mission and issues a rallying cry to the nation to heal our partisan divisions by joining together across party lines to address our toughest challenges. Heart of the Nation is being sold in bookstores as well as online.

Hear John Bridgeland speak about his book and its message below:
The Dove
Charlotte's Morning News with Don Russell
The Bill Martinez Show 
WIOD News Radio

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